Ice & Snow Clearance

Calstock Parish Council with the help and assistance of Cornwall Council, maintains 22 salt bins within the parish.

These are intended to help local community efforts to clear ice and snow from roads and pavements.

This salt is for use on the public highway only.

Applications for bins at other locations should be made to the Clerk to the Parish Council who will then implement the Council’s selection policy

If the a bin is nearly empty and needs filling, or has been damaged, please take a note of its reference number and location and inform the Parish Clerk

The following information is provided to act as a simple guide on how to clear snow and spread salt. It is provided to offer a basic understanding of the process, highlighting some of the things to consider if you choose to undertake snow clearance and salt spreading, to help make the job easier. Click on the toggle boxes to find out more about key guidelines.

Snow Clearance ‐ Basic Principles
  • The only effective way of removing snow is simply hard graft and elbow grease.
  • Undisturbed snow is easiest to remove, as once walked on it becomes compacted and turns to ice, making it more difficult to clear.
  • The cleared snow should be moved to the side of the pavement or onto grassed areas. It is important to avoid blocking accesses to properties and driveways.
  • Pre‐salting an area before snow falls is useful in stopping the snow from sticking to the pavement surface but it will not remove the snow or prevent it from settling.
  • Once the area has been cleared of snow, a very thin layer of salt can be spread to prevent any melt water from refreezing on the pavement which creates a risk of black ice.
  • Do not be discouraged by lack of salt. Just clearing the snow exposes the pavement and the heat from any sunshine will warm the surface and evaporate any remaining snow or ice.
Avoiding negligent behaviour

Under common law a volunteer can only be considered negligent if they deliberately went out to create a hazard. Actions which could give rise to liability for negligence would be

(a) the careless release of snow from the shovel,

(b) the careless placing of snow so as to conceal or create a hazard and

(c) the use of water which actually increases the risk of slipping or skidding.

Therefore:

  • do not use water as this can refreeze and create black ice.
  • do not release snow from the shovel into the actual or potential path of vehicles or pedestrians.
  • do not dump snow so as to create or conceal a hazard.
Suitable Tools

Plastic light weight snow shovels or wide bladed shovels are the most appropriate tools

  • A regular metal shovel is the next best alternative but not as efficient, as the snow may stick to it.
  • If the salt is fine enough, you could use a domestic grass spreader or lawn feeder to spread the salt. Make sure you wash out any salt before using on grass unless you want to kill the grass!
  • Alternatively you can use a small scoop or garden trowel to distribute the salt if doing it by hand.
  • A wheelbarrow to move tools, carry salt or move snow.
Looking after yourself

The most important thing is to look after is yourself when clearing snow. If at any point you don’t feel confident to complete the task then you should not participate.

Suitable clothing goes without saying, boots or wellies and plenty of warm and waterproof clothing. 25% of your body heat is lost through your head and hands so wear gloves and a hat. If you are working near the road it is advisable to be as visible as possible and wear a reflective vest/jacket.

Clearing snow is hard physical work so if you volunteer make sure you are sufficiently fit, take plenty of breaks and know when to stop.

If you are working alone ensure you have informed someone, your contact, of where you are and how long you intend to be.

Have a charged mobile phone with you and phone/text your contact every one to two hours. Inform your contact of any changes to location or estimated return time.

Salt – what does it actually do?

Salt – what does it actually do?

Clearing snow is hard physical work so if you volunteer make sure you are sufficiently fit, take plenty of breaks and know when to stop.

If you are working alone ensure you have informed someone, your contact, of where you are and how long you intend to be.

Have a charged mobile phone with you and phone/text your contact every one to two hours. Inform your contact of any changes to location or estimated return time.

Compact snow and ice – what can be done?

Compact snow and ice – what can be done?

Clearing snow is hard physical work so if you volunteer make sure you are sufficiently fit, take plenty of breaks and know when to stop.

If you are working alone ensure you have informed someone, your contact, of where you are and how long you intend to be.

Have a charged mobile phone with you and phone/text your contact every one to two hours. Inform your contact of any changes to location or estimated return time.